Journal

Brewing in the Wild

Being able to brew great coffee wherever and whenever you need it most has always been a key aim of ours. No matter where you are or what equipment you have with you, you should still be able to brew the best cup of coffee possible.

Nowhere is this truer than in the great outdoors, whether that's camping in the wild or hiking up a mountain -- a great cup of coffee is the perfect accompaniment. 

Over the recent Summer Solstice weekend, Sheffield-based bikepacking brand, Pannier, set up camp at Stanage Edge in the Peak District and invited tourers to join them for a few days of riding and socialising out in the wild. We roasted a batch of our Rwandan filter, Kirehe Remera, for them to brew up each day.

But brewing in the wild provides some unique challenges and so with practicality in mind, and travelling light a priority, we also put together a few tips to help keep your coffee tasting sweet even with a more lo-fi brewing set-up.

Aeropress

Use a metal filter
You can leave paper ones at home, so the filter holder isn't taking up the space of half a water canteen. Metal filters allow more oils and fine sediment into your cup, and need rinsing and wiping off once you've brewed, thus ensuring the oils don't turn rancid and taint your next cup. 

Use a scoop
Every AeroPress comes with a scoop which promptly gets tossed into the "random things" drawer in everyone's kitchen. It's actually pretty decent. The spoon end of a spork (below) also makes for a good alternative. 

Grind a touch coarser
You should be using a Porlex when camping; it slots into your AeroPress chamber when packing, is quick, and doesn't require an energy source besides yourself. Rather than trying to squeeze down your AeroPress with a considerable amount of force when you're likely brewing on an uneven tree stump or a mossy woodland floor, go for a coarser grind and longer steep time, with an extended stir to make sure the coffee extracts properly. A coarser grind will also make plunging through a metal filter that little bit easier.

Brew inverted
Make sure the rubber bung is securely in place in the brewing chamber and add your ground coffee. Then slowly top up with freshly boiled water to just shy of the brim of the AeroPress a this equates to around 250g of water. Get stirring and leave for a few minutes to steep before placing the filter and cap in place, flipping onto your tin travel mug, and slowly plunging. 

Pourover

Take pre-rinsed filter papers
If you're the kind of person to be doing pour-over brewing in the woods, you sound pretty into your coffee. For single cup brewing, the taste of a filter paper will come through if it's unrinsed, but when camping, water and heat will be in short supply compared to back home. Therefore when packing, spend a minute a few days before you leave rinsing a short stack of filter papers in your pourover cone, letting them dry before popping into your rucksack. That way you can brew straight away without having to boil extra water.

 

Grind a little finer than normal
This might sound counter-intuitive given the AeroPress brewing advice to grind coarser whilst camping but bear with me. The hard part of pourover brewing without scales is getting an accurate coffee-to-water ratio. We all know the right amount of coffee to water, ground on the correct grind setting gets you a cup of coffee which is well extracted and brewed to the proper strength. What we propose you do in the woods, however, is to purposefully brew a cup that's a bit too strong, but is properly extracted. Then, to dilute the concentrated cup and open up the flavours, add a little hot water to taste. 

 

Aim for a large bloom and higher brew bed throughout
As you won't be packing a gooseneck kettle, pouring carefully, slowly and accurately, in all likelihood, won't be possible. To counteract this, and still get an even extraction, start by pouring quite a lot of water onto the grounds, more than you would at home. Get a spoon in there and make sure that all the grounds are wet in this initial slurry, before continuing to pour. Keep the level of water quite high in your cone, as this will hopefully achieve a higher temperature in the brew slurry. Maintaining a high temperature, combined with a finer grind, means you'll be able to extract all the delicious flavours from your ground coffee, with less water than you would use to pour through the coffee bed at home. 

Dilute
When you feel like you've got a strong cup of coffee under the cone, take it off and taste it. Add a splash more hot water, mix and taste again. Keep doing so until the coffee is at your desired strength then savour and enjoy.

Cowboy Coffee
Finally, if you forgot to pack a coffee brewer, but still have your grinder or pre-ground coffee with you, don't fret. You can still brew a super lo-fi cup of coffee in your saucepan or kettle. This isn't going to be the most refined cup of coffee you'll ever drink, but here are some tips to get closer to that sweet spot. 
 
Use a medium grind size
There will be a tendency to want to grind very coarse when you're making steeped coffee. However, a coarse grind size won't allow you to reach an optimal extraction when the water and coffee are just sitting together, slowly infusing. Use a generous scoop for each cup you're making, and in the tried and tested tradition of English tea brewing, throw in another one "for the pot". This way you can opt to dilute the slightly strong coffee with a splash of water or milk, which will also stretch the amount of brewed coffee to go that little bit further. You'll have to leave behind some of the brewed coffee in the pan to avoid grounds in your cup, so having a slightly more concentrated brew to dilute down is a good thing. 
 
Boil and stir
Don't be afraid of brewing with boiling water. Measure out the water in the cups you'll be drinking from. The moment your saucepan is at a gentle rolling boil, turn off the gas and dump all the coffee grounds in (a hearty scoop for each cup, and one for the pan). Make sure at this point to use the back of a spoon to knock down any coffee grounds that are trying to float on the surface. Once they're all wet, you need to wait just a couple of minutes before giving the whole lot a really good stir. The grounds will have degassed and are ready to take on the water and start to diffuse their flavour into the liquor. 
 
Be patient and gentle
This is make or break for your cowboy coffee. You're now sat in front of a scalding hot pot of coffee which will be tastier the longer you leave it, and also will be more clarified the longer you leave it. The coffee grounds will slowly be sinking to the bottom of your pan. After a good ten minutes, you can start thinking about serving up the coffee. It is best to do this in one go, rather than to pour one cup and set the pan down again, and then to pour another cup later. Line up your mugs and ever so slowly and gently pour off the brewed coffee, trying not to disturb the grounds that have settled at the bottom of the pan.

"Everything we needed, we carried " | Italy on a Tandem

I’m still not entirely sure how I ended up owning a tandem. A friend and I decided we would cycle to Southern France and our pub logic dictated that it would be cheaper to buy one bike than two.

Turns out it was, and we did.

Then we found there were other advantages like no splitting up or waiting at the top of a hill, always being able to chat to each other but most of all it was fun.

When somebody sees us passing on tandem, it invokes one of two emotions - sheer joy or utter confusion. The former normally from children, the latter from old men (and both are just as funny to watch).

Having been on a few solo cycling tours, and after years of promising, it was time to (literally) take my girlfriend Brooke along for the ride. Cycling for me is the only way to see a country properly. I’m not normally a ‘quoter’ but there’s one from Ernest Hemingway that says:

“It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them.”

I can confirm that this is doubly true on a tandem. 

Greatest of all though, cycling means you get to eat (and drink) as much as you like (it’s fuel after all) and what better place to be fuelled than Italy.

We didn’t do too much planning for the trip. We were flying into Genoa and back from Rome 15 days later. Other than that, all we had on our to-do list were a few pretty towns, gelato, cheese, pasta and vino. We couldn’t go far wrong really.

Our first destination was Cinque Terre - five colourful coastal towns surrounded by mountains and connected by a train cutting through the cliffs. Unfortunately for us, tandems weren’t allowed on the train so it was the one road in (down) and one road out (up) for us. After three of the five towns and lots of pushing, we managed to beg our way onto the ferry - much easier.

From the coast we headed inland to the heart of Tuscany; Lucca, Montecatini, Siena, San Gimignano, Chianti, each town more stunning than the last. We quickly fell into the Italian pace of life, winding our way down through the countryside, stopping for swims and gelato when we fancied.

Everything we needed, we carried. Tent, food, clothes, water, wine, beer, cheese - all the essentials. The problem with one bike between two is that it means half the bags. We therefore had to be particularly strict when it came to packing. An AeroPress, some Workshop Coffee and a Porlex grinder ended up taking priority over an pair of pants.

Lugging coffee and a grinder may seem like an unnecessary luxury (especially when in Italy), but this trip wasn’t about speed. Camping, cooking and brewing were just as much part of the experience as the pedalling.

Though the landscapes, views and roads change daily and a daily routine quickly took hold and coffee always came first.

Laying in your sleeping bag, looking out onto a new view each morning, we'd go through the AeroPress routine and it was pure perfection. Along with a breakfast of banana porridge and local honey (or if we were having a lazy morning, scrambled eggs), our coffee tasted even better outdoors.

Riding through the stunning Italian countryside, your mind would wander to all sorts of places but quickly settle on food. Cycling became the thing we did in between eating; set off: café stop with pastries; a bit of riding; lunch of fresh bread, local cheese and ripe tomatoes; a little more pedalling; gelato time.

We got used to it pretty quickly.

Italy was everything we hoped for. The Tuscan landscape was as beautiful as imagined, the gelato as smooth as promised and the wine - well, tasted of wine (I’m more of a beer man).

Doing it all on a tandem made the whole trip even more fun, for us and the locals. People would genuinely smile, laugh and point as we passed. And the answer to the question that everyone asked and you’re probably thinking: yes, I do know if she’s pedalling (or not as the case might be).

Luke Clark is co-founder of The 5th Floor cycling team. 

June 18, 2014

Aeropress › Events › UKAC ›


2014 UK Aeropress Championships

Last month we opened the doors of our Holborn Coffeebar to a throng of competitors and coffee lovers, playing host to the 2014 UK Aeropress Championships. For the uninitiated, the Aeropress is a single serve coffee brewer that is escalating in popularity dramatically of late. Invented by Alan Adler (of the Aerobie Flying Ring fame), the Aeropress is the method that we use for by-the-cup coffee brewing in our stores, and we were subsequently very happy to co-host this year’s competition to find the best of the ‘Pressers in the UK, alongside our friends from Square Mile Coffee and CoffeeHit.

A whopping forty-two competitors, and as many onlookers again, showed up to an afternoon of disco, Kernel Brewery beer and Aeropress mayhem, all tightly scheduled and operated by a team of our retail managers and supervisors. Bags of a blend of African coffees from ourselves and Square Mile were waiting for competitors to collect and serve to judges James Bailey, James Hoffmann and special guest Klaus Thomsen.

Some took the challenge of brewing a blend of two coffees to heart, separating out the components and pairing each with a distinct grind size, before blending again to achieve a more uniform extraction when brewed. Others selectively picked and ditched one component entirely, defaulting to what they are more used to working with, not really entering into the spirit of the competition.

Excessive cooling of the brewed coffee didn’t generally pay off. Some competitors iced their cups, or decanted and aerated for a significant portion of their brewing time. Most of these suffered from flattened aromatics and murkiness. Several bowls were barely recognisable due to the choice of brewing water, especially in the case of a magnesium rich water which altered the aromatics and the acidity of the coffees entirely. There was a wide range of degrees of clarification, with some competitors intending to increase suspended solids, emphasising the length and weight of the brewed coffee. Others opted for more clarity, using cloth, multiple Aeropress filters, or thicker bond paper filters for better clarity and definition. Broadly speaking, the less ‘murky’ bowls cupped better.

After many rounds, and far too much coffee tasting for a Saturday afternoon, Gabrielle of Square Mile Coffee won 1st place, Oli of Workshop Coffee Co. placed 2nd, and Pete (also of Square Mile) placed 3rd.

 

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For more information on the World Aeropress Championships, visit www.worldaeropresschampionship.com

April 28, 2014

Aeropress › Events › UKAC ›


2014 UK Aeropress Championships

 

** Tickets on sale 9:00am Thursday, May 1st through CoffeeHit **
http://www.coffeehit.co.uk/uk-aeropress-championships-2014

Good news, lovers of coffee,

The team at Workshop Coffee Co. are very pleased to be hosting this year’s UK Aeropress Championship, alongside our friends from Square Mile Coffee Roasters and CoffeeHit. We’ll be opening up our new Holborn Coffeebar to host the event on May 24th, starting at 3:00pm, with spectators welcome to attend.

Bigger and badder than last year’s competition, the 2014 event will be open to 36 competitors, vying for the chance to represent the United Kingdom at the World Aeropress Championships being held in Rimini, Italy during the World of Coffee event in June.

This year’s event will see the introduction of a competition coffee that all competitors must use for their brews. Half will be roasted by Workshop Coffee Co. in Clerkenwell, the other half will be roasted by Square Mile in Bethnal Green and the roasters will meet somewhere in the middle to blend the roasts together. Maybe on the Old Street roundabout, we’re not sure yet.

At the judging table will be Workshop Coffee Co. Head of Quality, James Bailey, Square Mile Coffee Roasters Managing Director, James Hoffmannn and, special guest judge all the way from Copenhagen’s venerable The Coffee Collective, Klaus Thomsen. Sweet funk tunes all evening long from DJ Wet Process, and compere duties from the incomparable, Ross Brownsofbrockley will ensure it’s an unmissable event.

Our first place winner will receive return flights to Italy to represent the UK in the World Aeropress Championships, with accommodation and a little spending money for Aperol spritzes and Caprese salads by the beach. Second place will receive a twelve month coffee subscription from both Workshop Coffee Co. and Square Mile, while third place will take a six month coffee subscription from both the roasters. All three place winners will also receive prizes from CoffeeHit and trophies from Aerobie.

Tickets for competitors cost £10 with the entire amount being donated to CoffeeKids. Tickets will go on sale May 1st through the CoffeeHit website (www.coffeehit.co.uk). Competitors will be furnished with more detailed rules, practice coffee and a competition schedule closer to the event date.

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When?
May 24th, 2014 @ 3pm

Where?
Workshop Coffee Co.
Holborn Coffeebar
60A Holborn Viaduct
EC1A 2FD

Brought to you by:
Workshop Coffee Co.
Square Mile Coffee Roasters
CoffeeHit
Mercanta
Aeropress UK

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